The State Hornet

CSU will not raise tuition after receiving extra state budget funding

New CSU budget includes $197 million in ongoing funding and $161 million in one-time spending

California+State+University+Chancellor+Timothy+White%27s+base+salary+will+increase+2.5+percent+to+%24450%2C345%2C+according+to+the+CSU%E2%80%99s+2018+executive+compensation+summary.+After+the+across-the-board+raise%2C+the+average+CSU+executive+will+make+%24333%2C447+per+year+in+salary+for+a+total+of+%249.6+million.
California State University Chancellor Timothy White's base salary will increase 2.5 percent to $450,345, according to the CSU’s 2018 executive compensation summary. After the across-the-board raise, the average CSU executive will make $333,447 per year in salary for a total of $9.6 million.

California State University Chancellor Timothy White's base salary will increase 2.5 percent to $450,345, according to the CSU’s 2018 executive compensation summary. After the across-the-board raise, the average CSU executive will make $333,447 per year in salary for a total of $9.6 million.

Screenshot via The California State University

Screenshot via The California State University

California State University Chancellor Timothy White's base salary will increase 2.5 percent to $450,345, according to the CSU’s 2018 executive compensation summary. After the across-the-board raise, the average CSU executive will make $333,447 per year in salary for a total of $9.6 million.

Caleb Danielson

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California State University Chancellor Timothy White praised Gov. Jerry Brown and the state Legislature Wednesday for choosing to increase the 2018-2019 CSU budget by $358.2 million.

After student and faculty protests against the proposed tuition increase, Chancellor White announced that the CSU would not raise tuition for the 2018-2019 school year.

“By providing sufficient funding to the California State University in the state’s 2018-19 budget, Governor Brown and the legislature made a wise decision that will provide California and Californians with both immediate and far-ranging benefits,” White said.

Chancellor White, Sacramento State’s Associated Students, Inc., and other student and faculty organizations have lobbied for more funding since the governor released his original budget proposal in January.

Sac State President Robert Nelsen criticized the state government in January for not fully funding the CSU system.

“The State of California is clearly divesting from its sacred responsibility to educate its populace,” Nelsen said in his Jan. 18 spring address.

The January budget proposal called for increasing the CSU budget by $92.1 million, leaving a $170.9 million funding gap between the governor’s proposal and the $263 million requested by the CSU Board of Trustees.

The Board of Trustees initially proposed a $228 tuition increase for undergraduate students to compensate for the lack of funding.

The board also proposed increasing tuition for credential programs by $264 and increasing tuition for graduate programs by $432.

RELATED: Governor’s budget proposal may lead to $228 tuition increase for CSU students

That decision left the CSU dependent on the governor and the Legislature to increase funding, or else face cuts to programs and services.

While the Board of Trustees called for a $263 million increase to the CSU budget, the budget approved by the governor Wednesday increases CSU funding by $358 million — $95 million more than the amount requested by the board.

The 2018-2019 CSU budget includes $197.1 million that will go toward compensation increases for faculty, staff, and administrators, as well as other ongoing costs.

The budget also includes $161.1 million in one-time funding, which will be used to address deferred maintenance, expand enrollment, and support efforts to improve student well-being.

Chancellor White praised Gov. Brown and the Senate and Assembly leaders.

“On behalf of the entire CSU community, I want to express our collective gratitude to Governor Brown, Assembly Speaker Rendon, Senate President pro Tempore Atkins and the many legislators who had the vision to choose CSU,” White said. “That is a decision that will advance California.”

The new budget goes into effect on July 1.

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