Reportable offenses at Sac State rose in 2015, report shows

A+chart+shows+the+amount+of+certain+crimes+committed+in+2014+and+2015%2C+respectively%2C+according+to+the+annual+Clery+Report.+The+rise+in+crime+can+be+attributed+to+increased+cases+of+fondling.+%28Infographic+by+Barbara+Harvey%29
Back to Article
Back to Article

Reportable offenses at Sac State rose in 2015, report shows

A chart shows the amount of certain crimes committed in 2014 and 2015, respectively, according to the annual Clery Report. The rise in crime can be attributed to increased cases of fondling. (Infographic by Barbara Harvey)

A chart shows the amount of certain crimes committed in 2014 and 2015, respectively, according to the annual Clery Report. The rise in crime can be attributed to increased cases of fondling. (Infographic by Barbara Harvey)

A chart shows the amount of certain crimes committed in 2014 and 2015, respectively, according to the annual Clery Report. The rise in crime can be attributed to increased cases of fondling. (Infographic by Barbara Harvey)

A chart shows the amount of certain crimes committed in 2014 and 2015, respectively, according to the annual Clery Report. The rise in crime can be attributed to increased cases of fondling. (Infographic by Barbara Harvey)

John Ferrannini

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The total number of reportable offenses at Sacramento State rose from 29 to 36 in 2015, according to the annual Clery Report released by the Sacramento State Police Department on Sept. 30.

The rise can be attributed to increased reports of fondling, robbery and aggravated assault. While only one of each was reported in 2014, five cases of fondling and robbery and four cases of aggravated assault were reported last year.

“There’s been quite a bit of outreach done on sexual assault and recognizing sexual assault,” Sacramento State Chief of Police Mark Iwasa said. “People are hopefully trusting campus resources and feel comfortable reporting crimes when they occur. It is possible all the outreach is resulting in more people feeling comfortable to report.”

There were two reports of rape in 2015, the same as the previous year. One of the reports was from the on-campus residence halls.

Cases of drug, liquor and weapons referrals, however, have plummeted. Compared with 200 referrals for liquor violations in 2014, there were only 150 in 2015. Drug referrals lowered from 134 in 2014 to 65 in 2015. There were no weapons referrals in 2015, compared with two in 2014.

Iwasa said that the lower rate is attributable to changes in what offenses get listed on the Clery Report.

“We did do some redefinition of what is a reportable statistic,” Iwasa said. “There are violations that are reportable for disciplines and ones for referrals. The strict adherence to that criteria was done in this before (2015). … If someone found with alcohol was not referred to discipline in 2015, it was not part of the report.”

The Clery Act, which became federal law in 1990, mandates that colleges receiving federal funding release a detailed report of crime on campus each year. (Story continues below)

A chart shows the number of sexual assaults reported to the Sacramento State Police Department in 2013, 2014 and 2015.

A chart shows the number of sexual assaults reported to the Sacramento State Police Department in 2013, 2014 and 2015. (Infographic by Barbara Harvey)

The Sacramento State Police Department recommends following the following suggestions in order to stay safe on campus:

Walk in groups or pairs when you are out at night. Consider carrying a flashlight, whistle, pepper spray, and/or cell phone when you go out.

Program the Sacramento State Police Department’s dispatch number, (916) 278-6000, into your phone.

Learn the location of the nearest emergency “blue” phones on your walking routes.

Utilize the Hornet Night Shuttle, (916) 278-7260, or contact the Sacramento State Police Department for an escort when on campus at night.

Always be aware of your surroundings and always know where you are.

Watch for suspicious people or vehicles, and go to a place of safety if approached by a suspicious person or vehicle.

Never be afraid to make noise if you are attacked; yell, scream, and try to attract attention. The last thing an attacker wants is to have someone take notice.

For more information, please visit Sac State’s “We Care. We Will Help” sexual violence prevention web page atwww.csus.edu/titleix .”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email