Lead test results delayed until May, school says

Some+water+fountains+at+Sacramento+State+will+remain+shut+off+until+the+university+completes+its+second+comprehensive+test+for+lead+contamination%2C+which+will+not+be+finished+until+May+%E2%80%94+not+April+as+previously+indicated+%E2%80%94+according+to+a+school+official.+%28Photo+by+Kameron+Schmid%29
Back to Article
Back to Article

Lead test results delayed until May, school says

Some water fountains at Sacramento State will remain shut off until the university completes its second comprehensive test for lead contamination, which will not be finished until May — not April as previously indicated — according to a school official. (Photo by Kameron Schmid)

Some water fountains at Sacramento State will remain shut off until the university completes its second comprehensive test for lead contamination, which will not be finished until May — not April as previously indicated — according to a school official. (Photo by Kameron Schmid)

state hornet 2012

Some water fountains at Sacramento State will remain shut off until the university completes its second comprehensive test for lead contamination, which will not be finished until May — not April as previously indicated — according to a school official. (Photo by Kameron Schmid)

state hornet 2012

state hornet 2012

Some water fountains at Sacramento State will remain shut off until the university completes its second comprehensive test for lead contamination, which will not be finished until May — not April as previously indicated — according to a school official. (Photo by Kameron Schmid)

John Ferrannini

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Results of the second comprehensive test for lead contamination in Sacramento State’s drinking water sources, which were originally intended to be released in April, will not be available until May, according to a university official.

In a campus-wide email, Vice President for Administration Mike Lee said that “some of the sampling and testing has taken longer than we previously anticipated” and the tests will not be completed until May.

In the meantime, “you may see drinking water sources closed for the next few weeks as we complete the testing process,” Lee said.

The testing, which started March 2, comprises 494 drinking water sources that had either not been tested in January or were found to be contaminated at that time, according to Jill Parker, the interim senior director of risk management sources.

In the January test, approximately 20 percent of drinking water sources tested had lead contamination levels above 5 parts per billion, the bottled-water standard set by the Food and Drug Administration, and 27 sources had levels above 15 parts per billion, the action level designated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

The State Hornet will update this story as more information becomes available.

Additional reporting by Kameron Schmid

Print Friendly, PDF & Email